6 Foods to Improve Your Heart Health

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There is no shortcut, your cardiovascular health starts with good food and exercise.

Editor’s note: This article is provided for informational purposes only and is not meant to diagnose or treat any condition. If you have any health concern, see a licensed healthcare professional in person.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (1). Every year, 1 in every 4 deaths is caused by a heart-related disease. Amongst many risk factors, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and smoking have been named most critical, and almost half of Americans can identify with at least one of them.

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Jimmy Kimmel’s Son Is “Healthy and Happy” 6 Months After Heart Surgery

Camryn Rabideau

Oct 22, 2017 @ 11:45 am

This makes us so happy. Yesterday, Jimmy Kimmel gave his Instagram followers an update on his 6-month-old son Billy’s health, and yes, it’s good news!

Back in May, the Jimmy Kimmel Live! host revealed to his audience that his newborn son was having open heart surgery at just a few days after being born. Little Billy was born with a congenital heart disease and had a hole in the side of this vital organ. In addition to his first surgery, the newborn was going to need another procedure in a few months. As you’d expect, it was an extremely emotional time for the 49-year-old TV host and his family, but his son is now doing much better.

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Body weight trumps other factors in maintaining low blood pressure

By: Daniel Allar

A 25-year study of young adults transitioning to middle age revealed maintaining a healthy weight was more important in blood pressure control than other common health behaviors.

Specifically, participants who kept a body mass index of less than 25 kilograms per square meter were 41 percent less likely to have increasing blood pressure as they aged.

Researchers also analyzed the impacts of never smoking, zero to moderate alcohol consumption, exercising 150 minutes or more per week and eating a healthy diet in the 4,630 study participants. Results were presented Sept. 14 at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions in San Francisco.

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Brain Activity May Predict Stress-Related Cardiovascular Risk

By Traci Pedersen

In the largest brain-imaging study of cardiovascular stress physiology to date, researchers have introduced a brain-based explanation of why stress might impact a person’s heart health.

The findings, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, show that as we experience stressful events, our brains produce a distinct pattern of activity that appears to be directly tied to bodily reactions — such as rises in blood pressure — that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease.

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Heart-healthy cooking to prevent stroke

Your heart and brain need nutritious foods to stay healthy. And while we all know the importance of a balanced diet that incorporates fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean proteins and is low in sodium and both saturated and trans fats, did you know maintaining a healthful diet requires more than just choosing the right foods?

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Women with high-risk pregnancies far more prone to heart disease

Women who have high-risk pregnancies or complications in childbirth are up to eight times more likely to suffer heart disease later in life. And many mothers — and their doctors — are unaware of the danger. Emerging research shows heart disease is a long-term threat for women who develop diabetes or high blood pressure during pregnancy, for example, or those whose babies are born prematurely or precariously small.

Yet doctors do not typically advise women about their risk or counsel them to watch for symptoms, said Noel Bairey Merz, a cardiologist and director of the Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Center at Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles. Bairey Merz said doctors can see heart attacks and strokes coming, often 10 or 20 years ahead of time, if they are on the lookout. “This isn’t rocket science,” she said. “We just have to figure out how we can find the women who are at risk.”

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