Body weight trumps other factors in maintaining low blood pressure

By: Daniel Allar

A 25-year study of young adults transitioning to middle age revealed maintaining a healthy weight was more important in blood pressure control than other common health behaviors.

Specifically, participants who kept a body mass index of less than 25 kilograms per square meter were 41 percent less likely to have increasing blood pressure as they aged.

Researchers also analyzed the impacts of never smoking, zero to moderate alcohol consumption, exercising 150 minutes or more per week and eating a healthy diet in the 4,630 study participants. Results were presented Sept. 14 at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions in San Francisco.

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Brain Activity May Predict Stress-Related Cardiovascular Risk

By Traci Pedersen

In the largest brain-imaging study of cardiovascular stress physiology to date, researchers have introduced a brain-based explanation of why stress might impact a person’s heart health.

The findings, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, show that as we experience stressful events, our brains produce a distinct pattern of activity that appears to be directly tied to bodily reactions — such as rises in blood pressure — that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease.

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Heart-healthy cooking to prevent stroke

Your heart and brain need nutritious foods to stay healthy. And while we all know the importance of a balanced diet that incorporates fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean proteins and is low in sodium and both saturated and trans fats, did you know maintaining a healthful diet requires more than just choosing the right foods?

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Hitting cardiovascular health targets can help elderly live longer

By Will Boggs MD

(Reuters Health) – Meeting some or all of the American Heart Association’s seven ideal cardiovascular health goals is associated with longer life and fewer heart attacks and strokes, no matter your age.

In fact, in a recent group of elderly patients, “the benefit of an ideal cardiovascular health in reducing mortality and vascular events was comparable to what is observed in younger populations,” Dr. Bamba Gaye from University Paris Descartes in France told Reuters Health by email. “This is a very good news, which suggests that it is never too late to prevent the development of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD).”

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Reality check: Are dark chocolate and red wine not healthy after all?

TORONTO – They’re good for you, they’re bad for you. Dark chocolate, red wine and berries have been hailed as heart-healthy foods, but a new study suggests that the compounds at play don’t really help at all.

It’s a confusing time for wine and chocolate lovers. And at the center of the controversy is resveratrol – found in dark chocolate, red wine, grapes and most berries, nuts and roots.

In recent years, it’s garnered a lot of attention. Now Johns Hopkins University scientists say the claims made over the past decade seem to be crumbling.

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Fish Types You Need In Your Diet

Give a man a fish he will eat for a day, but teach a man to eat the right kind, he will live healthy forever. Known for providing high nutritional value, fish is one of the most preferable seafoods. These sea creatures are enriched with good fats and protein. Since ages, they have been touted to fight heart diseases and boost mental health. But choosing the right type of fish from a wide range is definitely a task. Here is a list of popular fish types that will help you determine what type of fish you should eat…

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