Reality check: Are dark chocolate and red wine not healthy after all?

TORONTO – They’re good for you, they’re bad for you. Dark chocolate, red wine and berries have been hailed as heart-healthy foods, but a new study suggests that the compounds at play don’t really help at all.

It’s a confusing time for wine and chocolate lovers. And at the center of the controversy is resveratrol – found in dark chocolate, red wine, grapes and most berries, nuts and roots.

In recent years, it’s garnered a lot of attention. Now Johns Hopkins University scientists say the claims made over the past decade seem to be crumbling.

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Fish Types You Need In Your Diet

Give a man a fish he will eat for a day, but teach a man to eat the right kind, he will live healthy forever. Known for providing high nutritional value, fish is one of the most preferable seafoods. These sea creatures are enriched with good fats and protein. Since ages, they have been touted to fight heart diseases and boost mental health. But choosing the right type of fish from a wide range is definitely a task. Here is a list of popular fish types that will help you determine what type of fish you should eat…

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THIS is as crucial as BLOOD pressure for heart health – but do YOU know about it?

By OLIVIA LERCHE

Blood flow has been branded the ‘third important pillar’ of cardiovascular health that people need to be aware of, but research has revealed few people realise that having smoothly-flowing blood is important.

Fruitflow+ Omega-3 – a tomato supplement – has been proved to show similar effects on blood as 75mg of aspirin.

Aspirin is a common medicine that has a number of uses, from relieving pain to reducing the risk of serious problems such as heart attacks and strokes – as it has an anti platelet effect.

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Stress in the Brain Today Manifests as Cardiovascular Problems Tomorrow

Zawn Villines, GoodTherapy.org Correspondent

Increased activity in the amygdala—a brain region associated with fear and other emotions—is correlated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study scheduled to be presented April 4 at the American College of Cardiology’s 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago.

Doctors have long believed stress could contribute to cardiovascular health issues, including high blood pressure and heart attacks, but the connection between the two issues was not well understood. This study sheds light on one mechanism by which stress might affect the heart.

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How Heart Disease Differs in Women

Gender can play a role in risk factors, symptoms.

Heart disease does not discriminate. It is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women, claiming more than 600,000 lives each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But there are gender differences that women need to be aware of.

During a heart attack, “time is muscle,” says Richard Krasuski, MD, a cardiologist in Cleveland, Ohio. “The quicker you get treated, the more heart you can salvage.” Being able to spot the first sign of an attack is critical, but that sign may not be one you typically think of.

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Meat-Heavy Diets May Raise Older Women’s Heart Risks

Vegetable protein sources appear safer….

Women over 50 who follow a high-protein diet could have a higher risk for heart failure, especially if most of their protein comes from meat, researchers report. The study couldn’t prove cause-and-effect. However, postmenopausal women with the most protein in their diet had a 60 percent increased risk of heart failure, compared with women who ate little protein, the study found. The findings were presented Monday at the American Heart Association annual meeting in New Orleans.

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Heart Disease in African-American Women

Splashing a little bit of water on her face didn’t calm Shermane Winters-Wofford’s first date jitters. And then what she perceived as nervousness escalated into sweating and tightness in her chest.

Although she didn’t experience the typical warning signs, Shermane was having a stroke.

A stroke? How could it be? After all, she thought of herself as perfectly healthy. But it turns out Shermane had been at risk all along. Like many other African-American women, she had a strong family history of high blood pressure and heart disease. Unfortunately, she didn’t discover this until it was almost too late.

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