Reality check: Are dark chocolate and red wine not healthy after all?

TORONTO – They’re good for you, they’re bad for you. Dark chocolate, red wine and berries have been hailed as heart-healthy foods, but a new study suggests that the compounds at play don’t really help at all.

It’s a confusing time for wine and chocolate lovers. And at the center of the controversy is resveratrol – found in dark chocolate, red wine, grapes and most berries, nuts and roots.

In recent years, it’s garnered a lot of attention. Now Johns Hopkins University scientists say the claims made over the past decade seem to be crumbling.

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Fish Types You Need In Your Diet

Give a man a fish he will eat for a day, but teach a man to eat the right kind, he will live healthy forever. Known for providing high nutritional value, fish is one of the most preferable seafoods. These sea creatures are enriched with good fats and protein. Since ages, they have been touted to fight heart diseases and boost mental health. But choosing the right type of fish from a wide range is definitely a task. Here is a list of popular fish types that will help you determine what type of fish you should eat…

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How Heart Disease Differs in Women

Gender can play a role in risk factors, symptoms.

Heart disease does not discriminate. It is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women, claiming more than 600,000 lives each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But there are gender differences that women need to be aware of.

During a heart attack, “time is muscle,” says Richard Krasuski, MD, a cardiologist in Cleveland, Ohio. “The quicker you get treated, the more heart you can salvage.” Being able to spot the first sign of an attack is critical, but that sign may not be one you typically think of.

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Meat-Heavy Diets May Raise Older Women’s Heart Risks

Vegetable protein sources appear safer….

Women over 50 who follow a high-protein diet could have a higher risk for heart failure, especially if most of their protein comes from meat, researchers report. The study couldn’t prove cause-and-effect. However, postmenopausal women with the most protein in their diet had a 60 percent increased risk of heart failure, compared with women who ate little protein, the study found. The findings were presented Monday at the American Heart Association annual meeting in New Orleans.

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Cardiogram Raises $2 Million To Predict Heart Health Issues Using Wearables

Tech Crunch – by: 

Health tech startup Cardiogram has raised $2 million in a seed round led by the a16z Bio Fund for an app that screens users’ cardio health and gives them help improving or maintaining it.

The company started out with an Apple Watch integrated app, initially. But it is ultimately planning to be a “device agnostic” business, and to make its app utilizable with all manner of wearables such as Android Wear watches, or various fitness bands and activity trackers from the likes of Fitbit or Garmin.

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Are We Reaching The End Of The Trend For Longer, Healthier Lives?

Factors Associated With Good Heart Health May Also Protect Kidneys: AHA

American Heart Association — Achieving the American Heart Association’s definition of ideal cardiovascular health may also help prevent chronic kidney disease, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Life’s Simple 7 are the ideal cardiovascular health factors/goals that include healthy blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, diet, body weight, enough physical activity and not smoking.

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